Tag Archives: food

science in my kitchen

Earlier this week I needed to keep a sandwich cool for a few hours, so I took an insulated lunch bag down from the top of the fridge. Since I work at home, I don’t have a lot of use … Continue reading

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dread potato disease

For today’s paper, I wrote about late blight – you may know it better as potato blight, the disease that caused the Irish Potato Famine. It’s still a huge problem for potato and tomato farmers, so a bunch of scientists … Continue reading

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döner kebap, how I love thee

Ah, the classic evening meal of cheapskates in Berlin: It’s a döner im Brot. It’s kind of a variation on a gyro – mystery meat shaved off a rotating hunk o’ broily goodness, stuffed in bread with sauce, slaw, onions, … Continue reading

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snorkel genes

Part of the deal with this fellowship is that I’m also supposed to do my regular work. So, here it is: a news story about rice genetics. I know, it sounds boring, but it’s totally not! Modifying rice is a … Continue reading

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mighty cultural exchange

I’m so glad I asked the downstairs neighbor to do my shopping today (my illness being such that I really don’t want to leave my apartment unless it’s for a medical facility). He was fast, and it wasn’t out of … Continue reading

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mmm, vanilla

Oh hey – another of my National Geographic stories turned up online! It’s about vanilla, which is native to central America but has until recently mostly been grown in Madagascar. I reported this story and the story about silky sifakas … Continue reading

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more sardines

Someone helpfully stopped by my post on sardines and left a link to this blog: Society for the Appreciation of the Lowly Tinned Sardine. It includes many lovely photographs of sardine tins on well-appointed plates – apparently you’re supposed to … Continue reading

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adventures in seafood

The other day I was at the grocery store, and I had tuna on my list. It’s easy, it keeps more or less forever, it fits in cans, I can put it on salads. But then when I was actually … Continue reading

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you say tomato, I say poop

A moment of culture clash: today I interviewed a researcher in England about his work on poop, only he didn’t call it poop, he called it poo. I hope to quote him on that. We also bonded on the topic … Continue reading

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important advances in snack food science

I’m sorry, it’s taken me much too long to get to this. After my successful oreo inquiry, I knew had to get to the bottom of the question: how do the shipboard Ritz crackers (prepackaged in pairs, for soup-related usage) … Continue reading

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